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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

June 2016 Employment and Unemployment in Oregon’s Counties

Hood River County had Oregon’s lowest seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in June at 3.9 percent. Grant County (7.6%) registered the highest rate for the month. Ten of Oregon’s counties had unemployment rates at or below the statewide rate of 4.8 percent and 11 were at or below the national rate of 4.9 percent. Sherman County saw its unemployment rate improve over the year by 2.0 percentage points, more than any other county.

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose in all of Oregon’s six broad regions between June 2015 and June 2016. The largest job gains occurred in Central Oregon (+4.0%). The Willamette Valley (+2.8%), Southern Oregon (+2.5%), Portland (+2.1%), the Oregon Coast (+1.8%), and Eastern Oregon (+1.6%) also saw growth.


For more information, read the full press release

Employment Among Oregonians with Disabilities

On July 26, the United States celebrates the anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, education, transportation, state and local government services, public accommodations, telecommunications and commercial facilities.

In 2014, there were about 600,000 Oregonians with disabilities according to American Community Survey. Older people are more likely to have a disability. In Oregon, 38 percent of individuals over 65 have a disability. About 13 percent of individuals between 18 to 64 years reported to have a disability and about 7 percent of population ages 5 to 17 years have a disability. Men and women have about the same rates of reporting a disability.

In 2014, the unemployment rate for working-age people with disabilities was 16 percent compared with 7.8 percent for the state's overall population. Among population ages 18 to 64 years, about 115,000 people with disabilities were employed and 22,200 were unemployed. About 179,000 were not in the labor force. Earnings for people with disabilities are lower than for those with no disability. In 2014, men and women with disabilities had median earnings of $22,172 and $15,664, respectively, while men and women with no disability had earnings of $33,178 and $23,772, respectively.

Gateways to Employment

Several Oregon businesses offer specialized training and job coaching services to people with disabilities. Besides helping disabled workers find and keep jobs, these services can reduce company costs associated with new hires.

To find out more about the benefits of hiring workers with disabilities, visit:
For assistance in hiring people with disabilities, visit the Employer Services website of the Oregon Department of Human Services' Office of Vocational and Rehabilitation Services and Services for Employers website of the Oregon Commission for the Blind.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Rises in June, Job Growth Continues

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.8 percent in June, an increase from May’s rate of 4.5 percent. One significant factor in the rise of the unemployment rate was a large increase in Oregon’s labor force, which reached an all-time high of 2,053,000. Despite the increase in June, Oregon’s unemployment rate remained significantly lower than the June 2015 rate of 5.8 percent.

Oregon’s 4.8 percent unemployment rate in June remained close to the national unemployment rate of 4.9 percent. Like Oregon, the U.S. rate also increased in June, rising from 4.7 percent in May.

Oregon’s payroll employment added 3,000 jobs in June after a revised gain of 2,500 in May.


Taking a longer-term view, payroll employment grew by 59,500 jobs since June 2015. The resulting over-the-year job growth rate was 3.3 percent in Oregon, much faster than the national job growth rate of 1.7 percent. Oregon’s over-the-year job growth has consistently outpaced the nation since 2013.

Read more: Oregon's Employment Situation.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Consumer Price Index for Shelter on the Rise in Portland-Salem MSA

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers in the Portland-Salem area grew 1.7 percent between the first half of 2015 and the first half of 2016, faster than the U.S. increase of 1.1 percent.

Portland’s recent focus on price increases in the housing market is reflected in the
Consumer Price Index’s shelter measure. The cost of shelter increased more (6.7%) in the Portland-Salem area than the U.S. city average (3.3%). Shelter is about one-third of the CPI - All Items, which helped push Portland's CPI above the U.S.

Shelter includes rent of primary residence, lodging away from home, and owner’s equivalent rent of primary residence. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, rental equivalence measures the change in the implicit rent, which is the amount a homeowner would pay to rent or would earn from renting.

In contrast, the Portland-Salem area had little change in prices for food. The over-the-year growth rate fell from 0.7 percent in the second half of 2015 to -0.4 percent in the first half of 2016. The over-the-year growth rate for the U.S. city average had a relatively moderate decline from 1.4 percent in the second half of 2015 to 0.7 percent in the first half of 2016.

Gas and oil prices decreased drastically over the year. The U.S. saw a drop of 16 percent in gas and oil prices, while Portland-Salem area saw a drop of 17.4 percent.

Oregon, an Important Wine Grape Supplier

Oregon's wine production is not only driven by the local demand, Oregon’s alcohol exports reached an all-time high in 2015. As reported by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission in 2014, local wine represented 22 percent of total taxable consumption. Wine had a favorable growth rate in 2015; after a couple of years of modest demand, sales of wine grew by 3.6 percent.

Oregon wine grape growers are now important national suppliers. In 2014, Oregon ranked among the top five largest producers of grapes in the United States. According to Southern Oregon University, acreage increased to 27,390 from 23,955 in 2013. Oregon grapes are now recognized both nationally and internationally, winning several best in class awards at the recent L.A. International Wine Competition. Specifically, the pinot noir variety has been ranked among the best wines in the world.

There are five traditional growing regions in Oregon. North Willamette Valley is the largest in the state, followed by the Rogue Valley, Columbia River, South Willamette Valley, and Umpqua Valley.
To learn more about the wine industry in the Columbia Gorge, read Workforce Analyst Karla Castillo's article "The Columbia Gorge, a Blossoming Wine Region."

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Distilling in Oregon: A Small, Yet Growing Component of the State’s Craft Beverage Industry

When talking about Oregon’s craft beverage industry the conversation typically turns to the myriad of breweries and wineries dispersed across the state. This is for good reason as Oregon is a leader in the craft brewing industry and home to world-class wines. However, distilled beverages are often overlooked. These businesses specializing in the production of spirits or liquor are not particularly large contributors to Oregon’s economy as they are dwarfed by their brewing and winery cousins. Nonetheless, distilled beverages are growing in popularity, which sparked rapid growth in the industry over the past five years.

According to the OLCC, there are over 80 distilling licenses in Oregon. However, a more realistic count of distillers who are actively producing and selling their spirits is closer to 25. In 2015, 22 distilleries employed 219 workers across the state. According to the OLCC, the tax revenue from the sale of distilled spirits was $1.06 billion for the 2013-2015 biennium, which represented a staggering 96 percent of the revenue OLCC collects.

Only about 12 percent of liquor sales in the state were from Oregon distillers. The vast majority of liquor and spirits consumed in Oregon is imported from outside the state. Around 1.1 million gallons of Oregon-made liquor were sold inside the state last year. By far the most purchased Oregon liquor was vodka (40%), followed by whiskey (24%) then rum (15%).

A top 10 list for sales of local distillers in Oregon is a bit deceiving, as the list is completely dominated by Hood River Distillers. The Hood River based distiller sold over 910,000 gallons of liquor in Oregon last year. They produce a variety of brands including HRD, Monarch, Pendleton, and Sinfire, to name a few. The second highest selling local distiller in Oregon was Bendistillery (Crater Lake Spirits), which sold around 47,700 gallons here in Oregon, roughly 5 percent of Hood River Distillers volume sold.

Although Oregon distilleries may not compete with the brewing industry or wineries when looking at jobs or sales, it is growing at a much faster pace than those more well-known craft beverage industries. Expect to see new distilleries arriving soon as the industry is still young and Oregonian’s taste for craft spirits and liquor is on the rise.

To learn more about distilling in Oregon, read Regional Economist Damon Runberg's article "Distilling in Oregon: A Small, Yet Growing Component of the State’s Craft Beverage Industry."

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Higher Sales and Wages in Male-Owned Firms

In 2012, the U.S. Census estimates Oregon had 339,000 firms. Of these, 331,000 were classifiable by gender, ethnicity, or race. Men owned half of these firms, while women owned 37 percent, and equally male/female owned businesses made up 13 percent of the total.

Although men’s firm ownership share was proportionate with the state's population (50%), male-owned firms made up 75 percent of all firm sales and receipts in Oregon. Equally male/female owned firms accounted for 13 percent of sales and receipts, the same as the share of total firms. Sales and receipts from female-owned businesses made up a smaller share (12%) of total sales and receipts than their firm ownership share. Oregon’s male-owned firms with payroll employees also paid higher average wages ($39,000) than their female-owned counterparts ($28,600).

This disparity in firm sales and receipts and average wages can be partially attributed to the industry distribution of firms by male and female ownership. Oregon industries with the largest sales, receipts, or value of shipments in 2012 included wholesale trade, retail trade, manufacturing, and construction. The number of male-owned firms in these industries totaled 48,900. By comparison, women owned less than half as many firms (20,900) in these sectors.

Oregon’s top-paying industries also had far more firms owned by men. Male-owned businesses made up 61 percent of the total in management of companies and enterprises, which paid an average of $69,200 in 2012. Men owned roughly two-thirds of all finance and insurance firms ($60,000), as well as all mining and quarrying businesses ($56,400).


Still, in industries where both men and women had high concentrations of firm ownership, the male-owned businesses with payroll employees reported higher average wages. Female-owned retail trade businesses (13,700) outnumbered retail businesses owned by men (12,500). The average wage at the female-owned businesses was $25,300, while the average wage at male-owned retail firms was $28,900.

To learn more about female-owned firms, read Senior Economic Analyst Gail Krumenauer's article "Business Ownership by Gender in Oregon". 

Oregon’s Income is Less Dependent on Earnings, More on Benefits

The largest source of total personal income for Oregon residents is earnings (60%), followed by transfer receipts (21%), and dividends, interest, and rent (19%). In other words, for every $100 of income that accrued to Oregonians in 2015, $60.50 was derived from earnings, $20.60 from transfer receipts, and $18.90 from investment income.

Oregon’s per capita personal income was $42,974 in 2015, or 90 percent of the U.S. per capita income. Compared with the nation, Oregon relies more on investment income and less on earnings for its personal income. Over time, the composition of Oregon’s total income has changed, with more income coming from transfer receipts and less from earnings, although earnings still make up $3 out of every $5 earned by Oregonians.
‘Earnings’ is essentially income derived from working. Nearly half of Oregon’s wages are earned in just three industries: government; trade, transportation, and utilities; and education and health care (private). We’re no different from the nation in that regard. However, Oregon diverges from national trends in that we derive more earnings from manufacturing and company headquarters (management of companies and enterprises). For manufacturing, not only is it more concentrated in Oregon, it also pays more than the national average. For company headquarters, Oregon wages are lower than the national average but it’s still a high-paying industry which, like manufacturing, is relatively more concentrated here.

To learn more about other components of Oregonians' income: transfer receipts, dividends, interest, and rent, read Regional Economist Amy Vander Vliet's article "Oregon’s Income is Less Dependent on Earnings, More on Benefits".

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Oregon Employers Had 48,000 Job Vacancies This Spring

Oregon businesses reported 47,600 vacancies in spring 2016. That's an increase of 6,400 from winter, but 5,700 fewer job vacancies than the all-time high of 53,300 in spring 2015.

Oregon's construction industry, which has shown impressive job growth recently, reported 4,700 job
vacancies this spring. That marks an increase of 1,000 from the prior year, and the industry's highest vacancy total since the Employment Department's quarterly job vacancy survey began in 2013.

Hiring remained strong across the economy. Nine different industries reported at least 2,000 job vacancies in spring. Occupations with the largest number of vacancies reflected the broad variety in hiring. They included cooks, personal care aides, truck drivers, production workers, registered nurses, and auto body repairers.

At a regional level, the Mid-Valley -- which consists of the Salem and Albany metropolitan areas and Yamhill County -- saw a large increase in vacancies this spring. Industries with the largest gains included health care and construction. The Portland Metro area (Multnomah and Washington counties) and Lane County saw the biggest declines in the number of job vacancies over the year.
For more details about Oregon's job vacancies, visit the Publications page at QualityInfo.org and scroll down to the Job Vacancy Survey section.

Oregon Employers Had 48,000 Job Vacancies This Spring

Oregon businesses reported 47,600 vacancies in spring 2016. That's an increase of 6,400 from winter, but 5,700 fewer job vacancies than the all-time high of 53,300 in spring 2015.

Oregon's construction industry, which has shown impressive job growth recently, reported 4,700 job
vacancies this spring. That marks an increase of 1,000 from the prior year, and the industry's highest vacancy total since the Employment Department's quarterly job vacancy survey began in 2013.

Hiring remained strong across the economy. Nine different industries reported at least 2,000 job vacancies in spring. Occupations with the largest number of vacancies reflected the broad variety in hiring. They included cooks, personal care aides, truck drivers, production workers, registered nurses, and auto body repairers.

At a regional level, the Mid-Valley -- which consists of the Salem and Albany metropolitan areas and Yamhill County -- saw a large increase in vacancies this spring. Industries with the largest gains included health care and construction. The Portland Metro area (Multnomah and Washington counties) and Lane County saw the biggest declines in the number of job vacancies over the year.
For more details about Oregon's job vacancies, visit the Publications page at QualityInfo.org and scroll down to the Job Vacancy Survey section.

Friday, July 1, 2016

Fourth of July: Stars & Stripes and Fireworks

Oregonians across the state will be celebrating the 240th anniversary of our nation’s Declaration of Independence with barbeques featuring Oregon-grown fare, pies made from Oregon cherries, and fireworks as permitted under Oregon Revised Statutes 480.110 through 480.165. They will also enjoy displays created by Oregon’s professional pyrotechnic companies.

Fireworks

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that $311.7 million worth of fireworks were imported from China in 2015. U.S. exports of fireworks, by comparison, came to just $12.7 million in 2015, with Singapore purchasing more than any other country ($4.6 million). According to the 2012 Economic Census, sales of fireworks by wholesalers totaled $482.6 million, while sales of fireworks by retailers totaled $368.6 million.

Stars and Stripes

In 2015, the annul value of imported U.S. flags was $4.4 million according to the International Trade Statistics. The majority of imported flags were from China, with a value of $4.3 million. The U.S. exported $3.1 million worth of U.S. flags, with Mexico being the leading customer.

Population

In July, 1776, about 2.5 million people lived in the thirteen independent colonies, according to Historical Statistics of the United States, 1789-1945. Last Fourth of July, the estimated U.S. population was 321.4 million and Oregon’s population was 4 million.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Oregon Continues to Attract Migrants

In 2015, Oregon’s population increased by 51,100, surpassing the mark of 4 million residents. This marked growth of 1.3 percent over the year. A lot of Oregon’s population increase was due to net migration, which at 40,600 people was the largest net migration since 2006. Natural increases contributed 10,500 to population growth, which may be the smallest natural increase since 1973.

A positive value of net migration means more people moving into an area than leaving it, while a negative value of net migration indicates more people leaving an area than moving in. An area naturally increases in population if more births than deaths occur in a given year.






From 2010 to 2015, Oregon’s net migration gain was 120,000, which made up about 65 percent of the population gain. The net migration gain in metro areas of the state was 105,100, which accounted for 88 percent of total net migration gains in the state. Since 83 percent of Oregonians live in a metro area, this gain suggests the share of Oregonians living in metro areas is increasing slightly.


While metro areas in Oregon grew 5.3 percent between 2010 and 2015, rural areas grew only 2.2 percent. In some cases, counties saw a decline in population. Declines can occur due to losses in both natural growth and net migration, or one of the two factors outweighing the other.

To learn more about the counties experiencing population declines, read Employment Economist Felicia Bechtoldt's article "Oregon’s 2015 In-Migration Was the Highest Since 2006".

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Half of Top 20 Fastest Growing Occupations Are in Health Care

At the broad occupation group level, construction (21%) and health care (19%) top the list for fastest growing by 2024. In terms of fastest growing, half of the top 20 fastest growing occupations are in the health care field.

Service occupations (which include protective services, building and grounds cleaning, personal appearance workers, funerals service workers and more), and professional and related (computer occupations, engineers, drafters, scientists, education, and more) rank first in most job openings.

Service occupations made up 18 percent of the jobs in 2014, and are projected to comprise 22 percent of the openings over the decade. Office and administrative support shifted in the opposite direction, making up 15 percent of the jobs in 2014 but only 11 percent of the total openings over the 2014 to 2024 period.



Six out of 10 total job openings (440,100) are expected to be due to the need to replace workers who retire or otherwise leave their occupation, with the remaining due to new or expanding businesses.

The top five occupations in terms of projected openings with high school or less as the typical entry-level education are sales or service occupations. Those with postsecondary certificates or an associate’s degree as the typical entry-level education include health care occupations, truck drivers, automotive technicians, and computer users support specialists. In the bachelor’s or higher category, the top five are more varied.

More information about Oregon's occupational employment projections to 2024 can be found in the employment projections box on the Publications page at QualityInfo.org.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Oregon’s Labor Market Largely Unchanged in May

Oregon’s unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.5 percent in May, the same rate as in the prior two months. This kept the state’s rate close to the national level, as the U.S. unemployment rate was 4.7 percent in May and 5.0 percent in April.


Payroll employment gained only 1,200 jobs in May, following gains averaging 5,300 per month over the prior 12 months. In May, most industries closely followed their normal seasonal patterns, with only a few major industries deviating substantially from their typical trend. Retail trade added 800 jobs and financial activities added 800. Meanwhile, other services cut 600 jobs while manufacturing cut 400.

Despite the modest May job gains, Oregon added 61,300 nonfarm payroll jobs over the year, equaling a growth rate of 3.5 percent. Since May 2015, construction grew at the fastest rate of the major industries, adding 8,100 jobs or 9.9 percent.

Manufacturing was the only major industry to decline since May 2015, as it cut 1,300 jobs, equaling a loss of 0.7 percent. May was the fourth consecutive month of declines in manufacturing. Several component industries within manufacturing cut jobs over the year including sawmills (-300 jobs), primary metals (-500), transportation equipment (-300), and paper manufacturing (-200).

For information, read this month's Employment Situation.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Health Care Leads Long-Term Job Growth in Oregon

The Employment Department's long-term employment projections to 2024 are now available for 100 industries and 700 occupations statewide. Oregon's largest industries -- such as health care and professional and business services -- are generally expected to add the most jobs in the coming years. Health care and professional and business services are also two of the three industries expected to grow the fastest by 2024.

Fast growth in health care (22%) can be attributed to the growth and aging of the state's population. Within health care, offices of practitioners (such as chiropractors and speech therapists) and other specialists are expected to grow by 29 percent, and nursing and residential care facilities should see job increases of 27 percent. That's much faster than growth in hospitals (9%).

Professional and business services growth (21%) will be driven by gains in professional and technical services such as computer systems design (40%) and management of companies and enterprises (27%). Management of companies and enterprises includes corporate headquarters offices in the state.

The state's fastest-growing sector will be construction (22%), just edging out health care. Strong demand, low inventory, and a growing population should contribute to the buildup in construction. This is particularly the case in Central Oregon, where construction growth is projected at 32 percent, and in the Portland area (Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties) with growth expected to reach 23 percent over the decade.

Despite rapid growth, projected construction employment (97,000) in 2024 falls short of the industry's peak employment (104,200) in 2007. Manufacturing, financial activities, and information are also expected to remain below peak employment levels between 2014 and 2024.
More information about Oregon's industry projections to 2024 can be found in the employment projections box on the Publications page at QualityInfo.org, or in the complete industry projections article

Friday, June 10, 2016

View from the Top (Wages, That is)

How would a wage of $78,500 strike you? Probably as a really good wage, but not an absolutely spectacular one. Now, how would you like to make that much every three months for a total annual wage of $314,000? Welcome to the world of the top 1 percent.

There were roughly 1.8 million workers in Oregon during the third quarter (July-September) of 2015. The top 1 percent comprised 18,168 individuals. The median, or middle, wage for this group was $78,499 for the three-month period, equal to $24,166 per month. The lowest wage in the group was $57,002 for the quarter, equal to $19,000 per month. If you made only $57,001 that quarter, you were in the bottom 99 percent of wage earners. Sorry.

The distribution of wages for the top 1 percent of wage earners is similar in shape to the distribution for all wage earners. The curve is relatively flat for most of its length, showing that most workers earn wages that are relatively close to the median wage. Nearly 80 percent of the workers in the top 1 percent had earnings within a range of the median plus or minus 50 percent. The curve becomes very steep at the right end, showing that only a small number of people at the top earn wages far above the median wage of $78,499 per quarter. In other words, even within the top 1 percent, there is significant inequality in wages.


For more on occupations and industries, read: View from the Top.